Cornered Cat - Instructor Ethics 101

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  • jve153

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    Love it. As far as the cop outs go, I can see those coming to mind. As an instructor in training teach non self defense, I still try to remember that the basics I teach are the building blocks to everything else these students will do with a rifle. Some of them are headed off to the military and I KNOW that effective basic marksmanship very well could me the life or death difference. You never know when someone walks into your class where they are headed next. That small amount of non self defense basics may just save their lives one day.
     

    ModernGunner

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    Excellent article.

    Isn't this why it's important to understand exactly why a student is coming to your (if you're an Instructor) class?

    For those students coming to class because they're getting their LTCH, you know why they're there. Especially so, since Indiana (currently at least) has no training requirement to obtain a LTCH.

    IMO, that's why, for those students who are seeking 'combat handgun' training, there should be NO such thing as "Beginning", "Intermediate", and "Advanced" classes. There's only ONE class, and that's the "You (the student) Gotta Survive" class. Anything else is just marketing and money, and a disservice to the student.

    What, the Instructor isn't going to get into fixing malfunctions until the "intermediate" class? What ELSE is the Instructor NOT gonna teach the student that the student won't (potentially) need as soon as they walk outta that class? What's taught in that beginning class? "Don't get in to a gunfight UNTIL you've got your 'certificate' from the Advanced class"??? :nuts:

    Just teach 'combat avoidance' in the first class? Combat avoidance is always the primary objective, in EVERY event. There's simply NO way to know that the student isn't going to need every bit of 'advanced' skill as soon as they leave the class and head to the theater to catch the latest movie.

    Theory is great, and HOPEFULLY no one EVER needs anything beyond that. But, it all gets VERY real when someone is pointing a gun at 'YOU', and pulling the trigger in your direction.

    The most logical and 'real' thing, then is for the student to learn from an Instructor who actually HAS 'been there / done that'.
     
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    esrice

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    IMO, that's why, for those students who are seeking 'combat handgun' training, there should be NO such thing as "Beginning", "Intermediate", and "Advanced" classes. There's only ONE class, and that's the "You (the student) Gotta Survive" class. Anything else is just marketing and money, and a disservice to the student.

    I completely understand where you're coming from, but I think the issue surrounding varying "levels" of courses comes from a lack of time to teach everything in a single sitting and a desire to compartmentalize training. And those aren't bad things.

    Sure a person might need to know malf clearance the evening after he just took a "basic" course, but he's just as likely to have needed it the day before class. There is only so much time to go around and it's a good thing when folks are willing to take steps to advance their skill level.

    Compartmentalizing your training can be a great thing, as long as it's prioritized and balanced.
     

    rhino

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    I completely understand where you're coming from, but I think the issue surrounding varying "levels" of courses comes from a lack of time to teach everything in a single sitting and a desire to compartmentalize training. And those aren't bad things.

    Sure a person might need to know malf clearance the evening after he just took a "basic" course, but he's just as likely to have needed it the day before class. There is only so much time to go around and it's a good thing when folks are willing to take steps to advance their skill level.

    Compartmentalizing your training can be a great thing, as long as it's prioritized and balanced.

    Good points!

    There's also the fact that you can't teach "everything" in one four hour block or even one day. When you split a 3 or 5 days class into pieces, you have to have names for them and a logical progression in that series makes sense to most people.
     

    esrice

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    When you split a 3 or 5 days class into pieces, you have to have names for them and a logical progression in that series makes sense to most people.

    Exactly. And I don't know about anyone else, but I hit a mental "wall" after so much concentrated learning has occurred. My first defensive pistol course was a 3-day Gunsite affair with Sheriff Campbell and after Day 2 I was having a difficult time mentally pulling in more information. Of course I was a noob and EVERY concept was new to me. I think you can do too much too soon.
     

    Coach

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    Some of the reason for different levels of classes has alread been stated. Some folks just want to plink, some want to compete, some just want to better understand safety. Many people own guns and don't carry guns. They are never going to be in a gunfight because they never carry their gun. They might get shot someday but it won't be a fight.

    I have different levels in my training program to try and enhance the students experience in a full day defensive class. A new gun owner with the price tag still dangling from the trigger guard is not ready to take a Defensive Pistol class.

    If a Basic or Intermediate pistol class address the fundamental and essentials of shooting, and the gun owner gets those down before a Defensive Class they will get far more out of a Defensive Class.

    I have had students in an intermediate class say to me 15 minutes in; "I should have been here this morning for the Basic class shouldn't I." The answer was yes. Knowledge and skill development that people have are at different levels. We don't all start from the same place. This is why there are different levels. It is not always about marketing. It is about trying to provide the best service and training possible.
     

    obijohn

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    IMO, that's why, for those students who are seeking 'combat handgun' training, there should be NO such thing as "Beginning", "Intermediate", and "Advanced" classes. There's only ONE class, and that's the "You (the student) Gotta Survive" class. Anything else is just marketing and money, and a disservice to the student.

    The most logical and 'real' thing, then is for the student to learn from an Instructor who actually HAS 'been there / done that'.

    Just curious. How long should this class be? How would you break up the material into palatable portions?

    I know many who have "been there/done that" that had zero ability to teach. By your comments about avoidance, shouldn't the instructor who in all other ways is knowledgeable and qualified who avoided conflict be the logical choice?

    In my experience as a teacher in several disciplines, part of the job is knowing the capacity of your student(s). Modern pedagogy is a wonderful thing.
     

    cedartop

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    .. Modern pedagogy is a wonderful thing.

    Had to look that up.:)

    Evan, Coach, rhino, obijohn, you are all right on with your responses. Factored into all of that is also the safety concern. Am I really being responsible if I ask a student who has not internalized the safety rules, and is not a competent gunhandler to shoot while moving or from the ground, or work in a 360 degree environment?
     
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