Wood stove setup questions

Dentoro

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It is going to be a straight black pipe up, at 20” below the ceiling I’m going to class A. Then through a Selkirk boot kit and another insulated pipe and a topper. I will us a bracket outside because of the wind we have. I plan on two screws per black pipe up to secure. It is probably 14 run of black and an additional two 36” insulated pipes.
 

Dentoro

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I want to thank everybody for their help again. I’ve never had a woodstove and I’m trying to do the installation correctly. I think I have all the pieces I’m just trying to figure out the I don’t knows.
 

Lee11b

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Agree with the comment on using stainless steel vent piping. YES it is EXPENSIVE!!! but so worth it!! In our old house, I installed a wood burning stove in our masonary chimney with the vent attached directly to the stove. The chimney was old, so with basically a one piece stainless flue liner attached directly to the stove, it vented incredibly well. The greatest part of the setup was the cleanup!!!! Damp towel over the front of the stove (of course cold stove-no fire) went on top of the roof with my 6" nylon bristle cleaning rod. Taking the vent cap off, 5 or 6 swipes up and down, stove clean!!!
 

indyjohn

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I want to thank everybody for their help again. I’ve never had a woodstove and I’m trying to do the installation correctly. I think I have all the pieces I’m just trying to figure out the I don’t knows.
Keep doing what you're doing - research and ask questions. This is my DIY stove. Sourced all the pieces and parts individually, not a kit.
2017-08-19v-small.jpg

2017-08-19u-small.jpg
 

Lee11b

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I had such a good setup. I found a company locally that used kiln dried popular to make RV furniture frames. Wood is hazardous to get rid of in the landfill and they didn't have employees that wanted the scrap. I had a Nissan XTerra at the time. They would put the scrap popular chunks in these heavy duty cardboard boxes. I could get 12 of them in the back, no mess little fuss. I would start the fire with a couple wads of newspaper and 4 to 6 chunks of that popular. 10 minutes, hot fire!!! Then I had dried red oak, that I stored in a galvanized grain dryer on our old farm. No bugs or mice in the wood. Those were the good old days!!! Heated the house for just the cost of the juice running the blowers on the woodstove and the chain saw and wood splitter gas. Sold the house when I got married.
Found out later the company that gave me the free popular went under.

SO morale of the story.... check and see if there is any local industry that makes wood products. You might be surprised and end up with a cheap, clean burning fuel source to supplement your heating.
 

indyjohn

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Have you checked with your insurance company to make sure your covered for a wood stove????
This is important! My insurance company required me to fill out a comprehensive form that detailed stove brand, how close it was to a wall(s), wall material, chimney construction, chimney material (they required the double wall pipe exiting the building). If I didn't meet -all- the national safety standards, they weren't going to cover me.
 

2in1evtime

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This is important! My insurance company required me to fill out a comprehensive form that detailed stove brand, how close it was to a wall(s), wall material, chimney construction, chimney material (they required the double wall pipe exiting the building). If I didn't meet -all- the national safety standards, they weren't going to cover me.
When i burned wood at a previous home , i had to meet code, and also had to pay more on my homeowners premium just to have a woodturner! and this was back in the 90's
 

JStang314

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When i burned wood at a previous home , i had to meet code, and also had to pay more on my homeowners premium just to have a woodturner! and this was back in the 90's
I can’t speak for all insurance companies, but our company doesn’t charge extra for having a wood burner. They do want them either installed to their standard specs or if the manufacturers specs are different, that is fine as long as we can show proof (usually a plaque on the unit). One huge no no is installing one in an attached garage.
 

JStang314

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As an agent, I would suggest giving your current company a call and see what their policy is. I can’t post our form on here but it’s pretty simple and I have to take measurements and fill out the form for clients. It’s fairly simple and as long as everything is done correctly they’re no big deal.
 

Dentoro

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Mecco’s liquid stove polish. I bought this put on because I could not find imperial paste polish. Now Imperial is what everyone reviews and throws on bare metal after they brush off the rust. However Mecco says not to use on bare metal. I don’t want to paint but it says to prim if needed. I’m not priming, should I just order imperial paste or does it also need to be primed before application?
 

russc2542

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Oct 24, 2015
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2' taller than anything within 10' horizontally according to my stove and pipe's directions.
Odd that it says male side of the pipe down. goes against both my stove's directions and the pipe directions.
8" vs 6" depends on what the stove calls for. too large of pipe won't work as well as a proper size pipe.
Use stove pipe cement on the joints, it's available in the stovepipe section of most HW stores.
My insurance said as long as it met the stove and pipe specs and it wasn't my primary source of heat (shhh lalalalalala), I could install it and no extra premium.


You'll learn your stove's nuances for both starting and running. how you start it will depend on outside temp, inside temp, fuel, pipe type and shape, stove type, etc. Mine doesn't draft well over 50f but the heat pump's in it's prime there. I usually leave a bit of ash/coals (even if they're cold) on the bottom (to insulate from cold metal floor), use a bit of paper, cardboard, and the chips, bark, and little bits from splitting under a log cabin style box.
 

***Ironhead***

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I suggest stainless and double wall pipe if it is going beside anything that can catch on fire. Stainless is more expensive put well worth it because it doesn't rust out in a few short years. Oh and 8" is way better than 6" i also clean my chimney out every 10-14 days. I heat with wood only.
Also insulate the pipe. At least it worked well for us.
 

DadSmith

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Also insulate the pipe. At least it worked well for us.
Yep I pull the paper off the back of R-19 and stuff it around the pipe also. Can never be to safe. My SIL is a firefighter so he has all kinds of good free advice and I'm willing to listen. He has set me up with a new smoke detector it uses some kind of sensor that see's smoke instead of smelling is how he described it. It has a strobe light and makes noise for people that can hear it. We installed it above my bed and it works great. That strobe light wakes me up really fast. I can't hear any noise without a hearing aid and they don't make a smoke alarm loud enough to wake me with my hearing disabilities.
 

shibumiseeker

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Crimped end up draws better and is less likely to leak under poor draft because it reduces turbulence in the pipe by keeping the flow laminar and creating a Venturi effect inside. This laminar flow also reduces creosote formation since laminar flow reduces the amount of creosote rich gas that contacts the flue walls and condenses off the creosote. Crimped end down reduces the creosote leakage as several have said here but also increases the likelihood of creosote formation in the first place. Burn dry wood properly and you should not have much creosote whichever way you point them.
 
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