Livestock?

Magyars

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And you don't have to cover the whole top.
My understanding is that raptors have such good eyesight that they won't attempt a swoop and grab if they don't have enough space to gain height quickly
 

IndyDave1776

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If you raise livestock KEEP IT OUT OF SIGHT FROM THE ROAD. As I have discovered from experience all it takes is one do-gooder to bring you months of misery even when the worst thing the state veterinarian comes up with is recommending a slight modification to your feed mix.
 

KLB

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Anyone raising their own food besides gardens? This spring I did the little chicks from rural king for the kids and now we’re getting roughly a dozen a day since it got cold. Was about 2 dozen a day before thanksgiving. Also the kids show pigs in 4-h and we have one butchered every year. We plan on having the older chickens butchered after they’re done laying.
Judging by the demand for livestock guardian dogs, a LOT of people are doing so. Our Maremma is pregnant and we have seven people already on the list to get one.

If you have issues with predators for any kind of livestock, I would strongly recommend you look into getting LGDs. There are a lot of different breeds with different traits, so I really recommend you research them.
 

Aggar

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If you raise livestock KEEP IT OUT OF SIGHT FROM THE ROAD. As I have discovered from experience all it takes is one do-gooder to bring you months of misery even when the worst thing the state veterinarian comes up with is recommending a slight modification to your feed mix.
We’re in a rural area and own all the land around the house. Just recently sold our last horse in June and have a little over and acre pasture. Was thinking of getting a couple sheep or calves for lawnmowers and eventually meat.
 

IndyDave1776

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We’re in a rural area and own all the land around the house. Just recently sold our last horse in June and have a little over and acre pasture. Was thinking of getting a couple sheep or calves for lawnmowers and eventually meat.
Put up a privacy fence.
 

Jaybird1980

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We used to raise hogs and beef, sold the property five years ago.
Now my buddy has the animals and we get butcher animals from him
 

cg21

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I don’t even feed my chickens, they clean up everyone else’s messes and they also forage. I don’t even have to mow the lawn in the summer from them pecking them grass to get bugs.
 

fullmetaljesus

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I was considering getting into chickens for both eggs and meat but I have no idea where to start. I've heard they eat the hell out of ticks and other nasties so that would definitely be a plus where I'm at. I'm guessing they require a decent investment in a pen/house?
If I may offer some advice. I raised chickens for years. Build your coop, I spent a few hundreds and built a cool that was several times larger than the one I would have bought for the same money.

If you are after eggs I also suggest rhode island reds. They are absolute work horses. One egg a day when it's sunny. In the winter it drops to about every other day or so.

Here's my coop right after finishing it.
FLmFJdy.jpg
 

teddy12b

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This spring we're getting chickens. We've never done it before, but we've talked about it for years and have helped other families when they've been out of town. It's overdue.

Where I live, I know we have coyotes, raccoons, fox, hawks, eagles and barn cats. We're going to buy one of those chain link fence setups with a roof because whatever enclosure we use will be under constant attack.

Any advice on the "start kit" of supplies we'll need when we get the pullets? I've been debating on how far out to start buying chicks because I don't know the timeline of getting them old enough to produce.
 

Aggar

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This spring we're getting chickens. We've never done it before, but we've talked about it for years and have helped other families when they've been out of town. It's overdue.

Where I live, I know we have coyotes, raccoons, fox, hawks, eagles and barn cats. We're going to buy one of those chain link fence setups with a roof because whatever enclosure we use will be under constant attack.

Any advice on the "start kit" of supplies we'll need when we get the pullets? I've been debating on how far out to start buying chicks because I don't know the timeline of getting them old enough to produce.
They’ll start laying at roughly 6-8 months old. I would stick with 1 or 2 different breeds. We have 6 different breeds and a few ducks. Eggs are all different sizes. Rhode Island reds are good hardy birds. Bantams lay little eggs. Half the size of a regular brown. We put ours in a galvanized water tank to start with so it’s easier to keep track of them especially when they’re small. Start the chicks out with some starter feed and then at about 4-5 months go to an adult feed. We use Kent eggstra egg layer Crumbles. They seem to do well on it. Get a small feeder and drinker. Fresh water daily and fresh bedding 1-2 times a week. Shavings are good. This is from our experience this year as we started just after easter last year. Others may have better advice.
 

Aggar

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This spring we're getting chickens. We've never done it before, but we've talked about it for years and have helped other families when they've been out of town. It's overdue.

Where I live, I know we have coyotes, raccoons, fox, hawks, eagles and barn cats. We're going to buy one of those chain link fence setups with a roof because whatever enclosure we use will be under constant attack.

Any advice on the "start kit" of supplies we'll need when we get the pullets? I've been debating on how far out to start buying chicks because I don't know the timeline of getting them old enough to produce.
Also when I put our outside fence up I put chicken wire down into the dirt away from the fence so predators wouldn’t have a hard time digging under the fence.
 

teddy12b

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They’ll start laying at roughly 6-8 months old. I would stick with 1 or 2 different breeds. We have 6 different breeds and a few ducks. Eggs are all different sizes. Rhode Island reds are good hardy birds. Bantams lay little eggs. Half the size of a regular brown. We put ours in a galvanized water tank to start with so it’s easier to keep track of them especially when they’re small. Start the chicks out with some starter feed and then at about 4-5 months go to an adult feed. We use Kent eggstra egg layer Crumbles. They seem to do well on it. Get a small feeder and drinker. Fresh water daily and fresh bedding 1-2 times a week. Shavings are good. This is from our experience this year as we started just after easter last year. Others may have better advice.
Also when I put our outside fence up I put chicken wire down into the dirt away from the fence so predators wouldn’t have a hard time digging under the fence.

That's some great advice!
 
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