Wood burning stove suggestion?

The #1 community for Gun Owners in Indiana

Member Benefits:

  • Fewer Ads!
  • Discuss all aspects of firearm ownership
  • Discuss anti-gun legislation
  • Buy, sell, and trade in the classified section
  • Chat with Local gun shops, ranges, trainers & other businesses
  • Discover free outdoor shooting areas
  • View up to date on firearm-related events
  • Share photos & video with other members
  • ...and so much more!
  • cg21

    Master
    Rating - 100%
    10   0   0
    May 5, 2012
    2,049
    113
    People with stoves fireplaces suggestions needed.

    I have a tri level. Obviously the BEST place to put a stove is the basement but the stove will have an oven and cook top so most convenient place is top level near the kitchen. So the living room (where we also get to enjoy the glass door of the stove) am I going to regret putting the stove in our main living area? Will it be unbearably hot? And will “enough” heat go down? I know heat rises I was considering a fan to help circulate Both in the living area and maybe at the stairs.
     

    Bugzilla

    Master
    Site Supporter
    Rating - 0%
    0   0   0
    Apr 14, 2021
    2,358
    113
    DeMotte
    Ceiling fans and air movement are your friends. Ours is in our living room. Does get warm in there but worth it. I have added vents in one wall to move air with a small fan inside the vent, but the better half keeps turning it off. As for our basement, heat rises. We have a small non vent gas heater in the basement. Set it at about 70 and it runs sparingly.
     

    Leadeye

    Grandmaster
    Rating - 100%
    4   0   0
    Jan 19, 2009
    33,995
    113
    .
    I have ours in the basement and it heats the entire house regardless of how cold it gets. The heat rises and runs across the ceiling to the stair well then goes to the main floor. You can feel the cold air running down the steps and over to the wood burner where it gets pulled in and heated.

    Most important thing if you go to indoor wood burning is the chimney. On an existing masonry chimney get a solid inspection, if installing new metal get the absolute best money can buy. Second most important is use dry wood.
     

    cg21

    Master
    Rating - 100%
    10   0   0
    May 5, 2012
    2,049
    113
    I have ours in the basement and it heats the entire house regardless of how cold it gets. The heat rises and runs across the ceiling to the stair well then goes to the main floor. You can feel the cold air running down the steps and over to the wood burner where it gets pulled in and heated.

    Most important thing if you go to indoor wood burning is the chimney. On an existing masonry chimney get a solid inspection, if installing new metal get the absolute best money can buy. Second most important is use dry wood.
    Like I said if it weren’t for the cooking and aesthetic appeal downstairs is the obvious choice.
     

    2in1evtime

    Master
    Site Supporter
    Rating - 100%
    60   0   0
    Oct 30, 2011
    3,387
    113
    retired-midwest
    Make sure your home owners ins will cover a woodstove, they may charge extra for one too. Sounds like you plan to cook on it too, sounds good too. I use to burn wood all the time, ended up taking our basement woodturner as to chimneys were collapsing on the liners [125 year old house} would love to put a outdoor boiler in but we don't have a big enough lot for it!
     

    Knight Rider

    Sharpshooter
    Rating - 0%
    0   0   0
    Jan 10, 2013
    368
    79
    Michiana
    My experience is to not go too big. You want the stove to burn hot to maximize efficiency and stay clean. We went two steps down from original spec and still roast the upper levels. Jotul 400 and zero regrets.

    Two inspections/cleanings in 8 years. Never more then dust to remove.
     

    Amishman44

    Master
    Rating - 100%
    35   0   0
    Dec 30, 2009
    3,139
    113
    Woodburn
    I have ours in the basement and it heats the entire house regardless of how cold it gets. The heat rises and runs across the ceiling to the stair well then goes to the main floor. You can feel the cold air running down the steps and over to the wood burner where it gets pulled in and heated.

    Most important thing if you go to indoor wood burning is the chimney. On an existing masonry chimney get a solid inspection, if installing new metal get the absolute best money can buy. Second most important is use dry wood.
    Some really practical points here...

    I'm looking to build a small cabin (12'x16') on a high point in a small 8-acre area along the river at dad's...and will use a wood-burner stove to heat it in the fall / winter time.
    I plan to install new, on a heat-brick floor and walls, with a cast-iron stove, not one of the thin 'metal' wood burning stoves. The cast iron version is more expensive, but well worth it.
     

    Bugzilla

    Master
    Site Supporter
    Rating - 0%
    0   0   0
    Apr 14, 2021
    2,358
    113
    DeMotte
    Some really practical points here...

    I'm looking to build a small cabin (12'x16') on a high point in a small 8-acre area along the river at dad's...and will use a wood-burner stove to heat it in the fall / winter time.
    I plan to install new, on a heat-brick floor and walls, with a cast-iron stove, not one of the thin 'metal' wood burning stoves. The cast iron version is more expensive, but well worth it.
    Electric radiant heat floor may be worth looking into also.
     

    tmschuller

    Master
    Site Supporter
    Rating - 100%
    39   0   0
    Feb 25, 2013
    2,262
    113
    Grant county
    If you have a return in the same room as the wood stove or can get a return close and high as possible to it that the best scenario. You can run your furnace fan to move heat around to keep it even. When building keep this in mind or as an add on. Good advice as stated above. Some stoves have blower’s but not strong enough to push it throughout your home. I put a big fan behind ours and run it at night. Also have limestone all around the stove and it retains heat really well. I know not all have this but if you’re remodeling or building it’s a thought to consider
     

    Amishman44

    Master
    Rating - 100%
    35   0   0
    Dec 30, 2009
    3,139
    113
    Woodburn
    Electric radiant heat floor may be worth looking into also.
    Actually, we're planning on 'boxing' the floor in with a metal bottom against rodents, then plywood, then spray the inside of the box to seal it, then install bat to fill the space, then put the cabin floor down on top. Yes, it's a lot, but the Amish neighbors, around the area, do it that way with their cabins, and it seems to help keep the floor fairly warm in the winter, at least once you get the wood burning stove running for a while.
    Internal lighting will probably consist of oil lamps and, possibly, LED's running off of a rechargeable portable battery system?
     

    Creedmoor

    Master
    Site Supporter
    Rating - 100%
    1   0   0
    Mar 10, 2022
    2,348
    113
    Madison Co Indiana
    Actually, we're planning on 'boxing' the floor in with a metal bottom against rodents, then plywood, then spray the inside of the box to seal it, then install bat to fill the space, then put the cabin floor down on top. Yes, it's a lot, but the Amish neighbors, around the area, do it that way with their cabins, and it seems to help keep the floor fairly warm in the winter, at least once you get the wood burning stove running for a while.
    Internal lighting will probably consist of oil lamps and, possibly, LED's running off of a rechargeable portable battery system?
    We have Amish neighbors next to my familys farm. Burning standard oil lamps will gag you out. They burn Alladin Mantel lamps or a contained unscented candle.
    I burn an Alladin when im at my weekend place. I turn it off when I go outside.
    I would go solar with a good battery bank running led's.
     

    Lee11b

    Master
    Site Supporter
    Rating - 100%
    12   0   0
    Apr 22, 2014
    2,269
    113
    North Webster
    Some really practical points here...

    I'm looking to build a small cabin (12'x16') on a high point in a small 8-acre area along the river at dad's...and will use a wood-burner stove to heat it in the fall / winter time.
    I plan to install new, on a heat-brick floor and walls, with a cast-iron stove, not one of the thin 'metal' wood burning stoves. The cast iron version is more expensive, but well worth it.
    Sounds awesome Amishman!!!!! Try and get one with a glass front so you can visually enjoy it also.
     

    Amishman44

    Master
    Rating - 100%
    35   0   0
    Dec 30, 2009
    3,139
    113
    Woodburn
    Sounds awesome Amishman!!!!! Try and get one with a glass front so you can visually enjoy it also.
    Exactly...it'll have windows, an exterior door, a 6' or 8' deck facing the river, and a gravel wrap to absorb rain falling off the roof...or gutters into a storage container???
     

    indyjohn

    PATRIOT
    Site Supporter
    Rating - 100%
    76   0   0
    Dec 26, 2010
    7,171
    77
    In the trees
    Some really practical points here...

    I'm looking to build a small cabin (12'x16') on a high point in a small 8-acre area along the river at dad's...and will use a wood-burner stove to heat it in the fall / winter time.
    I plan to install new, on a heat-brick floor and walls, with a cast-iron stove, not one of the thin 'metal' wood burning stoves. The cast iron version is more expensive, but well worth it.
    This is a WoodPro WS-TS-2000 we bought at Mendards. It has done a great job heating our 16'x32' cabin. I decided to look at their recommendation based on square footage that I would be heating and went with the next model up. They have a 1500 model too.

    1669431773871.jpeg
     

    Amishman44

    Master
    Rating - 100%
    35   0   0
    Dec 30, 2009
    3,139
    113
    Woodburn
    This is a WoodPro WS-TS-2000 we bought at Mendards. It has done a great job heating our 16'x32' cabin. I decided to look at their recommendation based on square footage that I would be heating and went with the next model up. They have a 1500 model too.

    View attachment 238797
    Question: Can you cook on that front flat edge on top...is that wide enough for small pans, if needed?
     

    indyjohn

    PATRIOT
    Site Supporter
    Rating - 100%
    76   0   0
    Dec 26, 2010
    7,171
    77
    In the trees
    Question: Can you cook on that front flat edge on top...is that wide enough for small pans, if needed?
    Abso freakin lootly. It has room for two medium and 1 larger pot/pans. We have successfully used an iron skillet on a trivet for frying food. The OG says the pan directly on the stove can get too hot. We have two kettles, one for heating water for coffee and one for putting moisture back into the air. Today we took 10% of the humidity out of the cabin just by burning for a couple of hours.

    This particular stove is very easy to start and maintain good heat. We've found we can easily get it over optimal temp if we chuck 5 pieces of wood into it and close the door, it has a very strong draw when closed. We usually keep the door cracked open and that helps regulate the burn rate. The only thing some might not like is that 12" firewood works best. You can put 16" in it but it's tight.
     

    Site Supporter

    INGO Supporter

    Staff online

    Forum statistics

    Threads
    507,645
    Messages
    9,345,333
    Members
    50,528
    Latest member
    shardisty3
    Top Bottom