What’s your go to axe??

edwea

Marksman
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Jan 25, 2015
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New Dolan
I don't heat with wood anymore, but when I did I split with a fiskars. I know, plastic handle and all. Honestly it split like a dream. And I split about 15 or 16 ricks a year. For handwork around the woods in back, it's a crkt woods chogan. It's more of a tomahawk than a hatchet, but I love it. Sharpens well and seems well balanced (at least to me).
 

rosejm

Sharpshooter
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Nov 28, 2013
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NWI
Thanks for the responses guys. I need to start going to some yard sales. My sons and I (including my father) plan on building a few small cabins. Mostly for my kids to play in and I’d like to try doing them with hand tools. I already have the chainsaws.

Oh, in that case might I recommend some more internet viewing for the kind of tools & process that could be useful
'tube channel - Erik Grankvist

You can see how some of the techniques are refined as the cabin takes form
 

Leadeye

Grandmaster
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Jan 19, 2009
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Got splitter and multiple chainsaws but there are still times a hatchet and an axe are needed.

I've been lucky to not need them. Although it was hard to admit, I do like my Stihl battery saw for top work. Unlike any gas saw, when it's off, it's off. Been nicked by chains that were still moving at idle while I was negotiating my way through a top.

I do have a retired monster maul, sledge and wedges from my younger years.;)
 
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Sirshredalot

Sharpshooter
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Mar 15, 2011
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Muncie
One thing to note.

Most axe handles are waaay too thick to work properly or fit most hands.

Buy an axe with a replaceable wooden haft.

The slimmer the better, preferably ovular with proper grain orientation and flattened sides. Round is wrong.
Get out your spoke shave and gototown.

That handle should whip the axe head like a golf club. If it vibrates when you strike, go thinner/narrower.

Ive gotten decent replacement hickory hafts from beaver tools.

I use a 50 year old "wood slicer" sharpened on a slack belt then stoned.
Hatchets are sharpened on a mouse pad to 220.

Shred
 
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Oct 3, 2008
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On a hill in Perry C
I've got a Fiskars axe and hatchet I use for my manual wood cutting. Both Finnish (go figure!) made and work well. Can't remember what models. The hatchet is great for splitting wood for the smoker. That said, I much prefer to use a gas powered ax as much as possible.
 

avboiler11

Master
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Jun 12, 2011
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New Albany
I've got a Fiskars axe and hatchet I use for my manual wood cutting. Both Finnish (go figure!) made and work well. Can't remember what models. The hatchet is great for splitting wood for the smoker. That said, I much prefer to use a gas powered ax as much as possible.

Same here...Fiskars axe and hatchet.

They.just.work.
 

daddyusmaximus

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Aug 21, 2013
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Remington
Some people know all the details of an axe like they would a knife, and they look for the shape of the blade, type of steel, handle... I never did. To me an axe was always just a brute force tool. For years I just used an old Army surplus axe 'til one day I was out on a trip, and didn't bring it. Swung by a local shop, and they had a Fiskars. BIG difference. I like it a lot more. Probably need to learn more about axe design, and construction, but this one is real nice. Went, and got a matching hatchet...
 

Cameramonkey

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May 12, 2013
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Camby area
Some people know all the details of an axe like they would a knife, and they look for the shape of the blade, type of steel, handle... I never did. To me an axe was always just a brute force tool. For years I just used an old Army surplus axe 'til one day I was out on a trip, and didn't bring it. Swung by a local shop, and they had a Fiskars. BIG difference. I like it a lot more. Probably need to learn more about axe design, and construction, but this one is real nice. Went, and got a matching hatchet...
The only thing I dont like about my two Fiskars is the handle shape. Great overall. that curved end makes it VERY difficult to hold when trying to use the back as a hammer. Ive considered trying to figure out how to replace the handle of my shorty with a hickory handle, because one time I tried gripping it too low, and when I tried to swing it, the angle caused me to lose my grip and it went flying. It literally pried itself out of my hand.
 

thelefthand

Plinker
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Jun 8, 2008
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The only thing I dont like about my two Fiskars is the handle shape. Great overall. that curved end makes it VERY difficult to hold when trying to use the back as a hammer. Ive considered trying to figure out how to replace the handle of my shorty with a hickory handle, because one time I tried gripping it too low, and when I tried to swing it, the angle caused me to lose my grip and it went flying. It literally pried itself out of my hand.
That's the one thing I don't like about Fiskers. They are not striking tools. Mine is used for splitting at the wood pile when I don't want to bother with the Hydraulic. For striking, I use a regular ax of pretty much any kind. My favorite is my Counsel Boys ax. I like it because it's small and nimble. Easy to carry in the woods, good for removing small limbs, and for cleaning up the stringy stuff that the splitter couldn't quite separate. Also good for kindling. I did reshape both ends of the handle to suit my needs, but I've done that to all of my axes.
 

Cameramonkey

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But if I’m hiking or camping, I don’t want to have to carry a hatchet AND a mallet just because the hatchet has a poor handle design. Sometimes you need to whack something. (Tent stakes, etc)
 

thelefthand

Plinker
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Jun 8, 2008
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It's not just a poor handle design. Fiskers puts it in writing that their ax isn't a striking tool. I love my X27, but it stays at the wood pile. Realistically, it's probably fine for things like tent pegs. If I'm hitting something with an ax, it's a felling wedge, splitting wedge, or the back of another tool. I use a regular boy's ax for that. On the flip side, the only thing I split with my boys ax is kindling. It does a good job on that, but it's too light and has too short or a handle to be effective at splitting firewood for the house.
 
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