TRACT Optics

Soooooo... The polygraph.

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  • Sigblaster

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    Have you ever taken one? Would you ever take one?

    I have never been asked to take one, but I know people who have, for job-related/ security clearance reasons.

    It's junk science. Most people know this, I hope. You could probably get the same results by employing a Tarot card readear, a Ouija board, a Witch Doctor throwing the knuckle bones of his ancestors, or a drug dog.

    I know these things are really just interrogation tools. They really can't tell if you're lying or not, but they can make you admit to things you wouldn't do if you weren't hooked up to the machine. So they do serve some purpose to capture morons who don't know any better.

    But even if you were accused of a crime, would you take one to "clear" yourself, at least in the eyes of the investigators?
     

    Twangbanger

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    Sure, if done under Candy Crowley debate rules: give me the list of questions first and multiple days of rehearsal time ;)
     

    Sigblaster

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    I've taken one. They're junk science. I got away with a few blatant lies, but it said I was lying when asked if I had ever been fired from a job. I said no. I've never been fired...


    No, I'll never take one again.
    Were you accused of something, or was it a job thing?

    I know guys who have taken them for job.security reasons, really high level stuff, and they ask them some really messed up stuff to get a reaction. It's BS. The administrators know it's BS. They know it's a good interrogation tool, though.
     

    Rookie

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    Sep 22, 2008
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    Were you accused of something, or was it a job thing?

    I know guys who have taken them for job.security reasons, really high level stuff, and they ask them some really messed up stuff to get a reaction. It's BS. The administrators know it's BS. They know it's a good interrogation tool, though.
    It was a requirement for a job. I ended up turning down the job offer.
     

    Sigblaster

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    It was a requirement for a job. I ended up turning down the job offer.
    I get it. I applied for a job one time, and they asked me to take a test. I thought it was some sort of aptitude test, but it was one of those "personality surveys". More junk science. I looked it over, didn't answer a thing, and gave it back to them. They called me the next day and offered me a job, which I took.

    It was the interview, face to face, that got me the job. Later, boss told me I was the only one to refuse to do that stupid test. He didn't like it either.
     

    MCgrease08

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    Mar 14, 2013
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    I get it. I applied for a job one time, and they asked me to take a test. I thought it was some sort of aptitude test, but it was one of those "personality surveys". More junk science. I looked it over, didn't answer a thing, and gave it back to them. They called me the next day and offered me a job, which I took.

    It was the interview, face to face, that got me the job. Later, boss told me I was the only one to refuse to do that stupid test. He didn't like it either.
    When I moved to Indiana 15 years ago, I didn't have a job lined up but I had lots of experience waiting tables so I immediately started applying at local restaurants to try and get some cash coming in. I remember going to O'Charley's and they wanted me to take a personality test.

    I told them I would take it, but they would need to bring me seven of them as I suffered from multiple personality disorder. The manager didn't seem to get the joke, but I walked out laughing at him.
     

    freekforge

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    I had a hard time not laughing at some of the baseline questions. But yea it was joke. Apparently I don't drive a gray dodge Dakota...I drove it to the appointment.
     

    tackdriver

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    But even if you were accused of a crime, would you take one to "clear" yourself, at least in the eyes of the investigators?
    No. Never. Under the conditions you stipulated.

    If I were ever to be accused of a crime, I'm not giving anything. Period.

    ...Unless I'm certain it only helps me. (i.e. proof positive that I was out of the country, and the crime was committed in Utah.) Even then, I'll stay one step removed and let an attorney say the words and provided the evidence. Beyond that, it's their job to prove who's guilty. Ever hear that Miranda thingy. There was even a Supreme Court Justice (can't remember which one) that flat out said that only a fool would voluntarily speak with the police or the prosecution. I'd certainly put this in the same bucket.

    Now, if it were for other reasons, like a job, well... What's in it for me if I play along?

    Every day for decades, I've had to go along with stupid people, doing stupid things, because they don't know what stupid is. For the right prize, I'll keep playing.
     
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    tackdriver

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    oh... and I would also consider getting a strong confidentiality agreement, with sufficient teeth. If they want my private information, then they need to be as responsible with it as I would be myself, or compensate me as agreed ahead of time. If they're "good guys" and "trustworthy", then it shouldn't be a problem. Just keeping honest people honest and all.
     

    bwframe

    Grayish Man
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    Feb 11, 2008
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    I've done it twice.

    First time I was 19 year old manager of a large restaurant chain that had money disappear. I cleared myself on the theft, but the police detective doing the test was sure I was lying about never having smoked pot. He kept hounding it. I didn't give in and fess. ************! :xmad:

    Second time was for a job interview. The company flew me to Nashville to interview. All went well and they essentially hired me pending local polygraph test. Private operator polygraph testing outfit in Indy done the test on a Monday. The operator must have had a bad weekend. He got vocally angry with me for not understanding his poor instruction to intentionally lie (give him the wrong name) to test the equipment. That was the beginning of the test and it rattled me for the remainder. I reported the issue to the company that I'd hoped to work for, but didn't get the job.

    Won't be doing any more of them. :n00b:
     

    Dean Crail

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    Aug 25, 2013
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    It's BS junk science meant to scare people into telling the truth, my wife got an internship for the NSA one summer during college. The sent the FBI to her house to mask questions and hooked her up to a polygraph. The asked very general questions then try to narrow it down "have you ever done anything illegal" I though was a good one. I have too much self respect to work for the government so I won't ever have to dick with one I don't think
     
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