Lets talk pots and pans (seriously)

breakingcontact

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What high quality cookware do you recommend?

I am pretty health conscious so I am looking for durable high quality cookware.

I'm done going through Teflon coated skillets. I am easy on them but the coating wears off and is not healthy for a person.

Is glass the answer?

High quality stainless?

Cast iron?

Enameled cast iron?

I have an electric range. I'm not sure if that affects what cookware works better.

Thanks!
 

target64

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I do not recommend the Calphalon hard anodized non stick line. I do not think they are worth the cash. Their stainless line is fine.
 

Hoosierdood

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My go-to is definitely my cast iron. I cook everything in it. Eggs, bacon, grilled cheese, sauces, pies, casseroles, etc. I have never found a non-stick skillet that could cook like my cast iron could. I've tried the copper, diamond, teflon, etc. I still use my cast iron.
 

Expat

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I bought the wife a set of Le Creuset enameled cast iron probably 30 years ago. They have done pretty well.
 

Ingomike

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What high quality cookware do you recommend?

I am pretty health conscious so I am looking for durable high quality cookware.

I'm done going through Teflon coated skillets. I am easy on them but the coating wears off and is not healthy for a person.

Is glass the answer?

High quality stainless?

Cast iron?

Enameled cast iron?

I have an electric range. I'm not sure if that affects what cookware works better.

Thanks!

If this is about having the right tools for the job rather than a cool set, then you will be best served by a combination of cookware. Each one serves its own purpose, and cooks at different temperatures. I use higher end or restaurant grade non-stick for egg dishes and stick prone foods, have a pair of 8 inch for omelets and the like, a 10 and 13 inch. Also have real cast iron in 8,18,and 12 inches. I have a blend of enameled cast iron for chili and soups all the way up to oval roasters, with high end stainless clad pots to cook vegetables and the like. Then you will need a boiling pot for pasta and like.
 

breakingcontact

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If this is about having the right tools for the job rather than a cool set, then you will be best served by a combination of cookware. Each one serves its own purpose, and cooks at different temperatures. I use higher end or restaurant grade non-stick for egg dishes and stick prone foods, have a pair of 8 inch for omelets and the like, a 10 and 13 inch. Also have real cast iron in 8,18,and 12 inches. I have a blend of enameled cast iron for chili and soups all the way up to oval roasters, with high end stainless clad pots to cook vegetables and the like. Then you will need a boiling pot for pasta and like.
Definitely receptive to buying specific tools for the jobs.

Tried a Le Creuset enameled cast iron and after cooking eggs just once and not scraping on it the enamel is already starting to come off.
 

maxwelhse

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I'm a hardcoat anodized aluminum guy. I stick to the cheaper brands and have been reasonably pleased with the stuff. I've had this set from Sam's for about 3 years now and its showing basically no wear. For the price, I can throw the whole set away every few years and replace it if I want, but there's no indication that it won't go at least another decade.

It looks like they've private branded it now, but it was advertised as Tramontina brand when I bought it.

https://www.samsclub.com/p/members-...m-cookware-set/prod24641917?xid=plp_product_1
 

fordmanchris

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I have never used one, but carbon steel pans seem to be kind of between cast iron and stainless. I want to give them a try myself. I love cast iron but they are so heavy.
 

fullmetaljesus

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Once you have it well seasoned, how do you handle cleaning it?

I have a scrub brush this is only used for cast iron.
I put a little water in the skillet to cover the bottom about 1/8 of an inch deep. Stove on high. Then scrub while the water heats up. Scrub and rinse until clean. Then just a slight splash of water and quick wipe down with a paper towel the let it heat dry.

Then as needed I'll do a full season. However every handful of cleaning I'll wipe with oil just to keep it healthy (so to speak)

I'm rambling did any of this make sense?
 

Libertarian01

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The best, bar none in the world, is Mauvel. Link: https://www.mauviel.com/en/

These will last a lifetime.

One of the best enameled cast iron is Le Creuset. Link: https://www.lecreuset.com/

I saw a good article comparing Lodge to Le Creuset. The LC is several pounds lighter and has a less rounded bottom, so more cooking surface for the same sized pots.

Please note that you will PAY for the high quality!

Some folks don't like "stuff" sticking to the bottom of their pans. However, it is that "fond" that many chefs depend upon for deglazing and adding another level of flavor to their food.

Regards,

Doug
 

Hoosierdood

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Once you have it well seasoned, how do you handle cleaning it?

I use hot water, and a plastic scraper like the ones you would use on a pizza stone. Anything that is left, I lightly hit with a soft scrub brush that is only used for cast iron. Quick dry with a paper towel, onto a hot stove for a minute and light coat of oil.


I'm meeting a guy tomorrow to look at some pre-1940's skillets and dutch ovens. Some Griswolds, Wagners, and unmarked stuff. Will hopefully pick up a couple more pieces.
 

fullmetaljesus

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I use hot water, and a plastic scraper like the ones you would use on a pizza stone. Anything that is left, I lightly hit with a soft scrub brush that is only used for cast iron. Quick dry with a paper towel, onto a hot stove for a minute and light coat of oil.


I'm meeting a guy tomorrow to look at some pre-1940's skillets and dutch ovens. Some Griswolds, Wagners, and unmarked stuff. Will hopefully pick up a couple more pieces.

Color me jealous
 

Hop

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I've just started learning how to cook using cast iron. My Lodge is OK but nothing like my girlfriend's Wagner.
I like how cast iron holds the oil but haven't gotten the hang of it yet. I've already burned some stuff in it and had to re-season it.

My steaks still turn out much better using of a regular old T-Fal aluminum teflon "titanium" skillet. There's certainly nothing "titanium" about it from what I can tell.

Part of learning how to use the pan is learning how to use your stove. I have an infrared cook top. Girlfriend has gas. Neither of us is any good using the others stove. :):
 

churchmouse

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Spouse has went full on cast iron. The food is really amazing. It is a learning curve but once you get it you will not go back.
 
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