Gardening 2021

bwframe

Grayish Man
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Feb 11, 2008
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I'm having to go back and repackage dehydrated food from years past. I'm just not ready to toss some years old tomato leathers and Cayenne peppers.

These foods are a testament proper putting up and handling. I use them regularly, but obviously need to bump that up a bit.

A lot of storage of these dehydrated items, and some others has been in 1/2 gallon jars. Foodsaver vacuum packs the jars nicely.

This year fermenting has me scrambling for more 1/2 gallon jars. With a decent crop of cabbage, pickling cukes and onions, I'm transferring dehydrated foods from the jars onto foodsaver bags.
 

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BigBoxaJunk

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Feb 9, 2013
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Picked our first mess of white half-runner beans yesterday. Got enough to stir-fry with some baby carrots from thinning and zucchini.

Judging from the blooms, it's going to be an awesome year for my beans. It's honestly been more than ten years since I've had weather this good for my garden. The rain has been timed pretty well all season so far. I can't remember a spring season where I've not even had to empty my rain water tank during dry spells.
 

Biggredchev

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They sure look great. How will you store and or put them up?
They’ll likely stay in the ground until we eat them or i feel they need pulled. The ones that get stored will just go in a potato sack until they get used. We eat and give them to family like crazy so these will be gone by September. I dont really store anything but beans and meat long term.


Never seen a garden with that must rock in it. It has to be challenging with the hoeing and tilling?
Its really not as bad as it looks. The garden is on a slight hill and with the amount of rain we've gotten it has washed some soil down, my soil is pretty sandy though. When i clean it out in the fall i go through and pick the bigger rocks.

My retired grandfather in-law does alot of the prep work while im at work. He dumps some of his hog manure on it and has a Case 444 that he uses to till it in with. Never seems to have a problem, just tells me how sandy it is every year lol. He enjoys that stuff and does it while im at work.
 

Frontiersman

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Mar 3, 2021
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East Central Indiana
That sandy soil reminds me of the northwest. I always had a bumper crop of root veggies there. carrots, potatoes, onions. Those onions look great.

It's been a great growing season, but I lost all but my tomatoes to deer this year. They mowed the whole thing in a day. Even the marigolds. Go figure.

I'm thinking of a fence around the garden next year.
 

bwframe

Grayish Man
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Ripe cantaloupe rules never seem to work for me. The cantaloupe above seemed ready, sounded ready and smelled ready. Still had to pull the stem from it with noticeable effort.

The cantaloupe was good, but not incredibly home grown fresh good. Seemed like maybe picked too early?

I've been letting the next one go, looking for the stem to readily just pop off. Found this today...

20210808_154126.jpg 20210808_154105.jpg

Still had to pull fairly hard to separate stem from melon. :scratch:

Update edit...

This one tastes the same as the first one. Ripeness doesn't seem to be the issue.
 
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bwframe

Grayish Man
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Feb 11, 2008
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Seldom seen landowner of the pasture next to my garden seen my pumkins and was talking about his mom's great kabocha squash pie.

On a whim, I ordered some pricey seed. Be here Tuesday and going in the ground. No idea if there is time? Praying for late frost. Come on global warming...
 

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