Cost to install a cleanout on a sewer drain?

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  • CHCRandy

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    Feb 16, 2013
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    Hendricks County
    We are being told 4k. Which seems steep to dig a hole, cut the pipe and install a Tee/vertical. They also need to snake and scope it, so It hopefully includes that.
    Geeze, that seems expensive. I had to replace my sewer line several years ago. Money was really tight. I called ARS and got a $88 drain clean, as part of the deal you have to let them scope it and give estimate. They wanted $4000 to replace my sewer line, about 30 feet. I rented an excavator and went to pipe supplier......did it for less than $500 and a days work.

    You have to keep in mind though. When a contractor bids a job, especially digging....you just have to allow for "happenings". I have had jobs that I bid, and everything went fine and I make good money, but you are always 1 mishap or mistake away from losing money. If I charge someone $500 to put a $1000 window in, and I finish in 2 hours, I do well. But if something happens and I break that $1000 window, I just paid to replace the window.
     

    Ingomike

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    Geeze, that seems expensive. I had to replace my sewer line several years ago. Money was really tight. I called ARS and got a $88 drain clean, as part of the deal you have to let them scope it and give estimate. They wanted $4000 to replace my sewer line, about 30 feet. I rented an excavator and went to pipe supplier......did it for less than $500 and a days work.
    In Indiana hired plumbing work must be licensed, so you start with licensed companies, leaving out the option of those that do it cheaper on the side. Then add in fuel, labor, and insurance costs and it adds up. I have been told the insurance is expensive for this type of work as the risk of hitting something expensive while digging is so high.

    There are far less plumbers that do sewer lines than other work, it is somewhat specialized.

    Not excusing the cost just explaining it…
     

    Shadow01

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    In Indiana hired plumbing work must be licensed, so you start with licensed companies, leaving out the option of those that do it cheaper on the side. Then add in fuel, labor, and insurance costs and it adds up. I have been told the insurance is expensive for this type of work as the risk of hitting something expensive while digging is so high.

    There are far less plumbers that do sewer lines than other work, it is somewhat specialized.

    Not excusing the cost just explaining it…
    Yep, hit a fiber line or a gas line and in some cases your next stop is the courthouse to file bankruptcy. in many cases your are paying for knowledge and skill and not for the depth of the job.
     

    Shadow01

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    Anyone who digs without a valid utility ticket and doesn't hand dig paint/flag marks deserves to be sued.
    I’ve yet to see a contractor hand dig to 4 feet. Secondly I’ve witnessed more than a dozen locators return to damage from missed locates and remark their paint and take new pictures of their marks. I’ve also spoke to contractors that have said “that’s what insurance is for”. It runs the gamut. In the end the customer pays through higher prices.
     

    Creedmoor

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    Mar 10, 2022
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    I’ve yet to see a contractor hand dig to 4 feet. Secondly I’ve witnessed more than a dozen locators return to damage from missed locates and remark their paint and take new pictures of their marks. I’ve also spoke to contractors that have said “that’s what insurance is for”. It runs the gamut. In the end the customer pays through higher prices.
    We arnt discussing missed marks.
    I ran irrigation install crews for almost 10 years. Installed a few thousand systems.
    We Always hand dig at paint marks at least 16" on each side and about 6" deeper than needed for our pipe. Made bo difference if pipe was being pulled in or open trench.
    And for insurance to be good it has to have a valid ticket on that property.
    My sisters business puts pipe in the ground on 3 to 5 propertys 6 days 9 months a year.

    Try turning in to your insurance compay the second time you didnt find utililys before you started a diesel, while you're explaining to the neighborhood that you just pulled out a 30' piece of catv main and it will be 4-5 days before Comcast can repair it.
     

    CHCRandy

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    Hendricks County
    Anyone who digs without a valid utility ticket and doesn't hand dig paint/flag marks deserves to be sued.
    Yes, a dig ticket is a must on these....really even with a shovel anymore. 1 Fiber line hit with even a post hole digger could be $100K+!
    I’ve yet to see a contractor hand dig to 4 feet. Secondly I’ve witnessed more than a dozen locators return to damage from missed locates and remark their paint and take new pictures of their marks. I’ve also spoke to contractors that have said “that’s what insurance is for”. It runs the gamut. In the end the customer pays through higher prices.
    I have seen many hand dig a lot deeper than 4 foot. Foundation jacking is almost always hand dug....and them guys dig 6 foot diameter and go 6-8 feet deep to set hydraulic piers. I always hand dig when I am within 2 feet of a flag or mark. I have been sued before, by PSI many years ago. I got blamed for nicking a wire that resulted in a service outage and blown up appliances. It was like 6-8 years after I installed the fence....I had lost my dig ticket # and had not put the ticket # on customers receipt and my insurance covered it. That was like $35,000 20+ years ago.

    That dig ticket # is your insurance......and you better retain it forever. I now put dig ticket #'s on every customer invoice and try to keep track of them.
     

    edporch

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    Oct 19, 2010
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    Possibly the minimum of two feet but usually more and many old homes are 10-15 feet.
    True.
    In the case I was speaking of, my 1960 built house at that time was built on a slab, and the sewer line exited the house just under it.

    On the flip side, a house with a basement could have the sewer line exit the house under the depth of the basement floor like a couple other houses I've had.
     
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