Cost to install a cleanout on a sewer drain?

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  • Cameramonkey

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    I got a quote to install a sewer cleanout on the parsonage I oversee that seems a bit steep. This is from the property manager that doesnt always seem to find the best cost for us. And what makes it worse, is they tend to sit on it until it reaches emergency state, so that our policy of at least 2 bids isnt practical because we dont have time to wait.


    The house is having drainage issues. Its an ongoing issue on a house built in the 70s. They said they are confident the septic is fine, but they suspect the clogs are due to broken pipes under the slab. But they dont know for sure until they install a cleanout beside the house so they can snake/scope it.

    So the plumbers among us. what would you say is a reasonable cost to dig up the sewer main next to a house and install a cleanout?
     

    blain

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    I was helping with some drainage problems at the church I was attending years ago.
    The main drain needed snaking and a cleanout installed. The spot was easy access next to our parking lot.
    It was MANY years ago, but from what I remember Roto-Rooter did the job for what I considered a reasonable price.
    Like I said it was many years ago and I don't remember the specific cost, only that it didn't strike me as extreme at the time.
    We were a small neighborhood church, so the budget was not huge.

    As far as condition of the septic is concerned, I'd pony up for a pump-out and inspection (IF the manager has not done this or recently actually seen the condition of the out-flow end). If the out-flow concrete baffle breaks off (bolts rust away and allow it to fall into the tank), all the "muck" will flow right out into the field bed and clog it up.
    There's NO WAY to know the condition of that baffle without laying eyes on it (or inspection via camera. Either way, I would want to know.
    We wouldn't buy our house without first having the tank pumped out and inspected. Septic systems are too expensive and can be too disruptive, not to keep on top of them.
    I've heard people say they have lived for years at a place and never had the tank pumped or inspected.
    But that will never be me saying that. The risk/reward is too high, to not keep up with them.
     
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    Brandon

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    I have heard what our company charges... but I am not on the plumbing side and do not know if the jobs are comparable enough to even mention... but it was north of 4k.
     

    Cameramonkey

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    I was helping with some drainage problems at the church I was attending years ago.
    The main drain needed snaking and a cleanout installed. The spot was easy access next to our parking lot.
    It was MANY years ago, but from what I remember Roto-Rooter did the job for what I considered a reasonable price.
    Like I said it was many years ago and I don't remember the specific cost, only that it didn't strike me as extreme at the time.
    We were a small neighborhood church, so the budget was not huge.

    As far as condition of the septic is concerned, I'd pony up for a pump-out and inspection (IF the manager has not done this or recently actually seen the condition of the out-flow end). If the out-flow concrete baffle breaks off (bolts rust away and allow it to fall into the tank), all the "muck" will flow right out into the field bed and clog it up.
    There's NO WAY to know the condition of that baffle without laying eyes on it (or inspection via camera. Either way, I would want to know.
    We wouldn't buy our house without first having the tank pumped out and inspected. Septic systems are too expensive and can be too disruptive, not to keep on top of them.
    I've heard people say they have lived for years at a place and never had the tank pumped or inspected.
    But that will never be me saying that. The risk/reward is too high, to not keep up with them.
    Yeah, new baffle and pump out was last year. And new electrical panel the year before. damn house is a money pit it feels like.
     

    cburnworth

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    2-4 k is probably current cost.

    2 years ago roto rooter wanted to charge me around 2 k to dig up my yard, replace 10 foot of main & add a cleanout. I rented 2 excavators & dug the yard twice plus the cost of permit & parts and I was still under a grand. the biggest issue will also be the fact of leaving a big mound of dirt because they don't do landscaping
     

    Cameramonkey

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    2-4 k is probably current cost.

    2 years ago roto rooter wanted to charge me around 2 k to dig up my yard, replace 10 foot of main & add a cleanout. I rented 2 excavators & dug the yard twice plus the cost of permit & parts and I was still under a grand. the biggest issue will also be the fact of leaving a big mound of dirt because they don't do landscaping
    We are being told 4k. Which seems steep to dig a hole, cut the pipe and install a Tee/vertical. They also need to snake and scope it, so It hopefully includes that.
     

    cburnworth

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    It was $400 to rent the excavator each time I used it. the tee & pipe was cheap, I also needed to get a permit which was only $40 versus the $200 roto wanted to charge for that. How far from the house to the septic system? Personally I would just dig the whole thing up & replace all pipe from house to the septic. Depending on length I would recommend a couple cleanouts. I am no plumber , but have done just about everything that can be done on a house.
     

    Shadow01

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    We are being told 4k. Which seems steep to dig a hole, cut the pipe and install a Tee/vertical. They also need to snake and scope it, so It hopefully includes that.
    It would be cheaper to pull the toilet, scope and clean, then reset the toilet with a new wax ring. Then make a decision on the clean out and any other repairs from there.
     

    Cameramonkey

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    It would be cheaper to pull the toilet, scope and clean, then reset the toilet with a new wax ring. Then make a decision on the clean out and any other repairs from there.
    I believe they have already tried that. They have had ongoing isues with clogs. They believe the drain pipe is probably broken. but they cant scope the way they want due to a multi way connector that is causing problems.
     

    edporch

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    -Snip-
    ... dig up the sewer main next to a house and install a cleanout?
    I'm not even a plumber and I've put in a clean out before when I was quoted an outrageous price to put in a clean out about 10 years ago.
    The price of the parts was just a fraction of the price I was quoted.

    Often the sewer line as it comes out of the house will be pretty shallow, maybe 2 feet or less deep.
    EASILY reachable with a shovel.

    If memory serves.
    I first dug it up to see the size of the sewer tile.

    Then bought some
    - Schedule 40 PVC pipe the same size.
    - a clean out fitting that allows cleaning from both directions (see below)
    - a threaded clean out fitting
    - 2 x rubber clamp on couplers
    - pvc pipe glue

    I cut a piece of pvc pipe to glue in each end of the clean out fitting to match up with the sewer line at each end.
    Then attached both ends with the rubber couplers.

    Then glued a piece pf pvc pipe to come out of the top of the clean out fitting, and glued the threaded clean out fitting to the top at my chosen depth.

    Filled the dirt back in and I was ready to go with a bi directional clean out.

    AS LONG as the sewer line coming out of the house is shallow and easy to reach, this is a very easy job.
     

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    Cameramonkey

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    Except here is the problem, Ed.

    1. This is not my house. Its the property I oversee as a volunteer.
    2. I have neither the time nor energy to dig up a sewer line (for free) myself. Especially during the holidays.

    If this was my house, I would probably rent a mini excavator and tracer and DIY because its my wallet and I could tackle this myself.

    Ultimately it will all come out in the wash. We get rental income on the property. So it will pay for itself eventually. That rental income is gravy for us, and just puts a little more money in the bank while the renters keep the house from eating itself by sitting empty. But I appreciate the info. Hopefully it helps somebody else.
     

    Jaybird1980

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    Except here is the problem, Ed.

    1. This is not my house. Its the property I oversee as a volunteer.
    2. I have neither the time nor energy to dig up a sewer line (for free) myself. Especially during the holidays.

    If this was my house, I would probably rent a mini excavator and tracer and DIY because its my wallet and I could tackle this myself.

    Ultimately it will all come out in the wash. We get rental income on the property. So it will pay for itself eventually. That rental income is gravy for us, and just puts a little more money in the bank while the renters keep the house from eating itself by sitting empty. But I appreciate the info. Hopefully it helps somebody else.
    Does a plumber attend the church?

    See if they will give you a quote.
     

    edporch

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    Except here is the problem, Ed.

    1. This is not my house. Its the property I oversee as a volunteer.
    2. I have neither the time nor energy to dig up a sewer line (for free) myself. Especially during the holidays.

    If this was my house, I would probably rent a mini excavator and tracer and DIY because its my wallet and I could tackle this myself.

    Ultimately it will all come out in the wash. We get rental income on the property. So it will pay for itself eventually. That rental income is gravy for us, and just puts a little more money in the bank while the renters keep the house from eating itself by sitting empty. But I appreciate the info. Hopefully it helps somebody
    I understand. :)
    Yes, this info may help others when the see how easy it is WHEN the sewer line coming out of the house is near the surface.
    Mine was no more than a foot to a foot and a half deep.
    VERY easy to reach.
     
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