Clay sports gurus, shotgun question please

Born2vette

Marksman
Site Supporter
Rating - 100%
2   0   0
Jul 25, 2020
298
63
Westfield
I may have an opportunity to by a CZ standard sporter, 12 gauge, 30” that appears to be new old stock and has all original items (5 choke tubes, wrenches & tools). Would this make a good beginner trap gun? What would you think is a fair price to pay (Looking to offer something sub $1k maybe?).

Have never shot trap or any clay sports but looking to try and see if I like. If I hate it or suck, would this be something I could get my money back out of? Would not expect tp recoup my original investment but don’t want to take a $4-500 bath either.

Better suggestions in the sub $1k price range?

Thanks in advance!
 

MrMunster

Plinker
Rating - 100%
1   0   0
Jul 5, 2009
71
8
Start from a low ready position and bring it up to your shoulder. Repeat swinging left-to-right. Repeat swinging right-to-left. Repeat all 3. How does it feel?

As for the depreciation...can't be much worse than insurance on a Corvette.
 

BigRed

Grandmaster
Site Supporter
Rating - 100%
5   0   0
Dec 29, 2017
8,358
149
1,000 yards out
"General rule"...

If you hold it at your chest with your strong hand gripping the stock and your finger on the trigger, the butt should be comfortbly right in the crook of your elbow.

Others may have varying experiences and opinions.
 

Born2vette

Marksman
Site Supporter
Rating - 100%
2   0   0
Jul 25, 2020
298
63
Westfield
Start from a low ready position and bring it up to your shoulder. Repeat swinging left-to-right. Repeat swinging right-to-left. Repeat all 3. How does it feel?
Unfortunately it’s not local, so maybe I should pass and get something I can handle. But seems like a good deal as these were $2400 msrp new
 
Rating - 100%
3   0   0
Feb 26, 2010
4,834
63
Indianapolis
Over the years I have shot a pretty fair amount of trap so here is my opinion for whatever it maybe worth.
Especially given you said it isn't local, don't buy it. CZ shotguns seem to be decent for field use or occasional target shooting. I don't think they will hold the resale value very well. If you're looking to shoot a lot of targets, you will be money ahead buying a better gun to start with. Do you have a style of gun you prefer such as semi auto, pump over/under?
Some things to consider.. To check for a close gun fit, mount the gun with your eyes closed and then open your eyes. You should be able to see down the rib with very little adjustment of your head on the stock. Also, most people prefer to have the knuckle of their thumb about 2" or so from the tip of their nose. That will get you close enough to hit targets. If you get more serious you will want to get an adjustable stock. But, in trap you start with the gun mounted anyway so it doesn't have to be perfect to start with.
Check out Indiana Gun Club, they may have some used Browning or Beretta shotguns close to your price range and they will hold value much better.
 

Born2vette

Marksman
Site Supporter
Rating - 100%
2   0   0
Jul 25, 2020
298
63
Westfield
Over the years I have shot a pretty fair amount of trap so here is my opinion for whatever it maybe worth.
Especially given you said it isn't local, don't buy it. CZ shotguns seem to be decent for field use or occasional target shooting. I don't think they will hold the resale value very well. If you're looking to shoot a lot of targets, you will be money ahead buying a better gun to start with. Do you have a style of gun you prefer such as semi auto, pump over/under?
Some things to consider.. To check for a close gun fit, mount the gun with your eyes closed and then open your eyes. You should be able to see down the rib with very little adjustment of your head on the stock. Also, most people prefer to have the knuckle of their thumb about 2" or so from the tip of their nose. That will get you close enough to hit targets. If you get more serious you will want to get an adjustable stock. But, in trap you start with the gun mounted anyway so it doesn't have to be perfect to start with.
Check out Indiana Gun Club, they may have some used Browning or Beretta shotguns close to your price range and they will hold value much better.
I have a 12 ga Mossberg 500 with 18.5” barrel I am comfortable shooting, but not a great choice for clay sports I am told. I was considering an o/u for their mechanical simplicity (And easier spent shell clean up — I don‘t bend as well as I used to) but would be open to something else.

At least on their website used guns at Indiana Gun Club sub $1k choices are very limited And I have not seen anything in INGO classifieds that seems suitable.

i was considering this CZ as it is new (old stock), has adjustable comb and at the time they were current was the top of the CZ shotgun line and marketed as a dedicated clay sports shotgun: https://cz-usa.com/cz-sporting-overunder/ I have seen these go for $800 NIB. Old reviews I have found are favorable as well.

That said, I am open to something else but the Brownings and Berettas seem to start used around $1200 bare bones (need all the accessories, right?) which is a little more than I am willing to spend to try a new, expensive sport

I will make a trip out to Indiana Gun Club this week to look around.

Thanks for the input, I really appreciate the input and may need to reconsider whether to just stick with pistol sports.
 

gregkl

Outlier
Site Supporter
Rating - 100%
28   0   0
Apr 8, 2012
9,580
77
Bloomington
Over the years I have shot a pretty fair amount of trap so here is my opinion for whatever it maybe worth.
Especially given you said it isn't local, don't buy it. CZ shotguns seem to be decent for field use or occasional target shooting. I don't think they will hold the resale value very well. If you're looking to shoot a lot of targets, you will be money ahead buying a better gun to start with.
Check out Indiana Gun Club, they may have some used Browning or Beretta shotguns close to your price range and they will hold value much better.
This. Folks who hunted with shotguns and then decide to try the sporting side discover very quickly how much more they shoot competing vs hunting.

When I started with Trap, I used my Beretta field auto loader. It was pristine even though it was 30 years old at least. After my first season of Trap it was noticeably worn.

I had a CZ and after less than a season of Trap/skeet the action was much looser than when I bought it. I decided that if I am going to continue in the games, I needed a shotgun with more robust lock works. So I sold it. The guy I sold it to didn't mind that it had loosened up some since he knew he wasn't going to shoot it much.

My point is, if you are looking at longevity and plan to shoot often, spend more money. It will be a better ROI.

I did end up purchasing a better shotgun, but alas discovered that where I live, I don't have much opportunity to shoot shotgun sports so I sold it to a nice guy here on INGO!:):.

If you are only going to shoot occasionally, you could always put a different barrel on your 500 and shoot it for awhile. If I get the chance to do some shotgunning, I have no issues using my Beretta. Even though it has a 28", modified choke, it does fine if I do my part.

Good luck in your search.
 

BE Mike

Grandmaster
Rating - 100%
15   0   0
Jul 23, 2008
6,472
83
New Albany
I suggest getting a decent inexpensive shotgun first, or use what you have. You may find out that clays aren't your cup of tea. As you progress in the sport, you will discover what is a good dedicated shotgun for you. I have a buddy who is very good at shooting clays and he just uses an old Remington 870.
 

gregkl

Outlier
Site Supporter
Rating - 100%
28   0   0
Apr 8, 2012
9,580
77
Bloomington
I suggest getting a decent inexpensive shotgun first, or use what you have. You may find out that clays aren't your cup of tea. As you progress in the sport, you will discover what is a good dedicated shotgun for you. I have a buddy who is very good at shooting clays and he just uses an old Remington 870.
Plus, you may do what I did. I thought I wanted to shoot Skeet over Trap, hence the 20 ga CZ O/U but ended up preferring Trap which in my opinion needs to be 12 ga.

And for sporting Clays which I have never done, but looks like a blast, my Beretta would be just about perfect.
 

Born2vette

Marksman
Site Supporter
Rating - 100%
2   0   0
Jul 25, 2020
298
63
Westfield
For those of you who regularly shoo trap or skeet is there a preference for auto vs pump vs o/u or just what you are comfortable with?

I would prefer to buy something new as am not familiar enough with long guns to detect significant wear/defects but would be agreeable to used from a known seller.
 
Rating - 100%
3   0   0
Feb 26, 2010
4,834
63
Indianapolis
For those of you who regularly shoo trap or skeet is there a preference for auto vs pump vs o/u or just what you are comfortable with?

I would prefer to buy something new as am not familiar enough with long guns to detect significant wear/defects but would be agreeable to used from a known seller.
By far the most preferred gun for trap shooting is an O/U and most prefer 30"-34" barrels and in trap 12g is the king. The reason very few people shoot anything other than a 12g for trap is you are always at least 16yds from the back of the trap house and the target will most likely be 35-40yds out before you break it.
Most seem to prefer the simplicity of the O/U but also many like to rest the barrels on their foot while waiting their turn to shoot. That's because most dedicated trap guns are 9lbs and heavier.
Downside to an auto is they throw shells. Many competition shooters are shooting gun anywhere from 5-40k in value. They hate it when a shell is flung into their gun. So if you get an auto buy a shell catcher.
Going back to the budget of 1k, you might try looking for a used Browning BT99. It's a break action single shot trap gun and can often be found reasonably priced and they hold value. Nothing wrong with a Rem 870 or an old Winchester mod 12 either. As far as a CZ, a guy at the club I mostly shoot at has a Readhead Premier and it has held up pretty well. But he doesn't shoot hundreds of rounds a day either.
If you go to a gun club most trap shooters are more than willing to chat and many will let you try their guns before you buy. Beware many competition shooters can be gun snobs dedicated to the brand they shoot.
Trap really doesn't have to be super expensive to get started. A guy at our club is a beast with his Mossberg 500 and it has held up well shooting 3-4 boxes of shells per week (sometimes more).
 

sportsman223

Marksman
Rating - 100%
1   0   0
Aug 7, 2010
233
18
Passing on Doe's
Browning CX its a 60/40 gun really good for all the games, stay away from the CZ's not a bad gun just will not hold up to all the rounds
Like others have said an old 870 would be a good one. The brownings can be rebuilt we have ours done at the grand couple hundred dollars if my memory it correct.
Not to sound like a snob, but the problem with cheaper O/U sporting guns if they don't have problems when you have them there hard to get rid of no serious shooter will buy it and no hunter is going to send 700 to 900 on one to drag out hunting so you end up selling/trading on the downside to upgrade
 
Last edited:

Born2vette

Marksman
Site Supporter
Rating - 100%
2   0   0
Jul 25, 2020
298
63
Westfield
Went out to Indiana Gun Club today, I don’t think I have seen that many shotguns in one place. Going to take a lesson with a rental gun and see what I think. Their rental are Beretta A300s. They have about a dozen and the guy there said they get a lot of use/abuse and hold up well.

Did a little more investigation on the CZ I was looking at online and turns out it may be new but a factory second. One buyer complained about incomplete coating and arrived with some rust. Think I will stay away.

LGS had a Ruger Red Label 12 ga, 26” barrel in really nice shape. Looked to be a well made, solid gun but did not really fit me. He listed it on GB last night when I passed on it. He also has an old 870 Wingmaster that is priced low but has some funky (IMHO for a shotgun) custom furniture.
will continue to update as I progress, thanks thus far for all the great input.
 

Franc

Plinker
Rating - 0%
0   0   0
Oct 24, 2021
46
8
Fishers, IN
For those of you who regularly shoo trap or skeet is there a preference for auto vs pump vs o/u or just what you are comfortable with?

I would prefer to buy something new as am not familiar enough with long guns to detect significant wear/defects but would be agreeable to used from a known seller.
I shoot trap and sporting clays somewhat regularly and my daughter shoots in the Indiana state ATA match, so I do have some experience. When I first started I used my Winchester pump action. I could not go beyond two rounds (50 shots) without feeling battered by recoil. Later I got a Remington 1187 and it felt so much better. I never used a trap gun as I am not in competition and I hunt and shoot sporting clays, so I am used to "cover" the bird with my barrel.
My daughter started with a Beretta A300 field gun when she was 11. The gun is light but doesn't recoil much, due to the smooth gas action. She now shoots an over-under, like all other cool kids do.

The conclusion is, I think you can start with a gas operated semi-auto with at least 28" barrel. I would recommend either Beretta or Remington. No need to get a dedicated trap gun as it will not make a difference when you are new to the sport. If you really like trap and get to a decent level, then you can move up to a dedicated trap gun and retire your semi-auto to hunting duty.
 

Born2vette

Marksman
Site Supporter
Rating - 100%
2   0   0
Jul 25, 2020
298
63
Westfield
Went out to Indiana Gun Club this morning and took a lesson. Shot mostly on the sporting clay course and used a rental Beretta A300. Took about 80 shots and had a blast! At the end Kyle let me shoot once with his o/u to compare the felt recoil and it was not bad. Have not shot that much with a shotgun ever abd came home and did yard work but my shoulder is holding up well.

My instructor is a big advocate of o/u (simpler design, needs less cleaning, few things to break, can use 2 different chokes—one for up close and personal and one for farther away stuff; the last one is the most compelling argument to me) but doubtful I will find something at my price point that would not be really cheap or worn out. I looked at what they had new and used while out there and the choices are almost bewildering.

All that said, I now have an idea of how the shotgun is suppose to fit and feel and know I will not buy online unless I can find the exact same model to shoulder locally, the hunt is on.
 
Last edited:

popcorn09

Plinker
Rating - 0%
0   0   0
Nov 27, 2020
16
3
US
Most of the guys at our club don't shoot with their first shotgun. Either you bought something that wasn't meant for what you're shooting, it doesn't fit, or it fits fine and you can hit targets but you want to upgrade. If you're planning on selling or trading in what you bought buy something that holds it's value. I think the 'B' guns hold their value more than the CZ scatter guns.
 

jmarriott

Grandmaster
Rating - 100%
6   0   0
Dec 5, 2009
5,166
83
Madison county
The brownings have always been my cup of tea. Have one with the tubes and a skeet over skeet in 12 and 20.

I have also know which ones of the old ones to Stay away from. Salt wood brownings are not a good investment. That said the wood on them can be wonderful.
 

Site Supporter

INGO Supporter

Forum statistics

Threads
491,751
Messages
8,878,949
Members
48,283
Latest member
cwelling
Top Bottom